Dhana Jiru/Coriander Cumin Spice Powder

April 13, 2020mayurisjikoni
Blog post

EVENT: FOODIEMONDAY/BLOGHOP

THEME: #242 MASALA DABBA

What is a Masala Dabba?

Masala is the word that refers to spice in the Indian Subcontinent and dabba is a tin. Every Indian household wherever they may live, be it in India, US, UK, Australia, Europe, Africa, etc will have a tin where spices that are used regularly are kept. Just spooning them out from the masala dabba or tin is so much easier than opening and closing individual spice jars or bottles.

What my Masala Dabba contains

Depending on which part of India you come from or which community you belong to, the spices in the dabba will vary. For example my sister in law is married to a Kashmiri Brahmin so her masala  tin has Kashmiri red chili powder, ginger powder, fennel powder, turmeric, mustard seeds, cumin seeds or caraway seeds and asafetida. A typically Gujarati Masala Dabba is different, therefore I have turmeric powder (harder), red chili powder (lal marchu), coriander cumin powder(dhana jiru), mustard seeds (rai), cumin seeds (jeeru), fenugreek seeds (methi), carom seeds (ajmo) and asafetida(hing). However, that does not mean I don’t use other spices or spice powders. I do, usually they are stored away in a cool place or the fridge to keep them fresh.

masala dabba

FoodieMonday/Bloghop Theme

This week is another simple theme – Masala Dabba, suggested by Preethi considering that majority of us are still under lockdown, isolation or on social distancing. She suggested any homemade Masala or Spice Mixture that is used in our kitchens. For this theme I decided to make Dhana Jiru or Coriander Cumin Powder which is vital in any Gujarati Kitchen. However, we’ll talk a bit more about it later.

Spices and Indian Subcontinent Cuisine

No Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi cuisine is complete without spices. Spices or spice mixtures are added not only for flavors but also because they are beneficial for health. As I mentioned above, which spices are most used in what proportion will depend on the cuisine. Take Mughlai or Awadi Cuisine, so many of the aromatic spices like cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, saffron, anise, bay leaves, fennel seeds, etc are used. In the South Indian cuisine basic spice blends usually consist of red chilis, mustard seeds, cumin seeds along with curry leaves, coconut, and lentils. So many dishes from the east part of India will have a mixture of nigella, mustard, fennel, fenugreek and cumin seeds which is known as Panch Phoron or Panch Putana.

Some Spice Mixtures you may want to check out:

  • Preethi uses homemade Flaxseed and Curry Leaves Powder when she makes chutney, dals, curries, raita, stir fried veggies, etc. What I like about this spice blend is that she has used curry leaves and flaxseed along with other spices.
  • The Garam Masala, Gujarati Style that I use is a spice mixture I learnt from my Mother in law and I tend to use it for stuffed vegetable sabji, rice dishes and dals.
  • Thandai Masala Powder which can be widely used not only to make thandai (a cooling drink) but is used to make flavorful cookies, cakes, muffins, desserts, etc.
  • Tea Masala is commonly used to make masala tea. I tend to add it to cakes, muffins, cookies, desserts and sweet breads whenever spices are required.
  • I would recommend you use Priya’s Curry Podi for any South Indian curries that you may want to try out.
  • Check out how Ruchi makes Sambhar Powder at home. By the way Sambhar powder is a vital spice blend required to make the famous South Indian Sambhar or Curry that is served with idli, dosa, vada or rice.
  • Want to use a spice blend that is not hot as in taste wise but still adds a wonderful aroma and colour to basic Indian Curries? Well then you’ve got to try out Jagruti’s Homemade Indian Curry Powder which is not to be mistaken with  Garam Masala.

spice collage

How to Make Spice Powder at Home

Its pretty easy, you just need the required spices. These spices are then generally roasted over low heat to release their natural oils which gives the  flavors and aroma. Be careful not to burn the spices. Usually each spice that is required is roasted individually. The spices are allowed to cool before grinding them together in a food processor or coffee grinder. Store the spice powder in an airtight container to retain the freshness. Traditionally, spice powders were made at home. I remember helping my mum make the various spices at home by pounding it with a pestle in a big mortar. Back then homes didn’t have the modern gadgets that we have nowadays.

Dhana Jiru/Coriander Cumin Powder

Dhana Jiru is basically a combination of roasted coriander seeds and cumin seeds. Some add turmeric to it some don’t. Dhana Jiru is used in every Gujarati home for all the dals, curries, shaaks/Sabjis (vegetables), and some snacks too. I cannot imagine making bhinda nu shaak(okra stir fried), Stuffed brinjal, Tuvar Dal, without dhana jiru. I like to make small batches so that the freshly ground spice powder adds much flavour to the dish. If you want to add turmeric then generally a small dried piece of it is added to the spices before grinding. I usually don’t add that as I prefer to add  turmeric separately. It is so easy to make dhana jiru as the ratio is 1:¼. I of coriander and ¼ of cumin, whatever you use for measuring.

Dietary Tips:

  • Gluten Free
  • Vegan
  • Satvik

dhana jiru 3

dhana jiru 2

dhana jiru 1

dhana jiru 4

dhana jiru 5

DHANA JIRU /CORIANDER CUMIN POWDER

Makes approx. 1 cup

2 cups coriander seeds

½ cup cumin seeds

  1. Dry roast coriander in a wide pan or karai over low heat till you get the aroma of the spice, the seeds begin to crackle and it turns light golden in colour.
  2. Transfer the roasted coriander seeds into a wide plate or tray to cool.
  3. Add cumin seeds to the pan or karai. Roast over low heat till it turns light brown in colour and begins to crackle.
  4. Add the cumin seeds to the coriander seeds.
  5. When the mixture is cool, using a food processor or a coffee grinder, grind to a powder. Here you can grind to a coarse powder or a fine powder. I prefer in between.
  6. Store dhana jiru in an airtight container or jar.

Tips:

  • Don’t roast over high or medium heat.
  • Don’t burn the spices.
  • Don’t leave the roasted spices in the hot pan or karai, otherwise it will get burnt.
  • Store the powder in the container or jar when it cools down a bit.

Pin for Later:

dhana jiru

A little request:

If you do try this recipe then please either

  • add a comment below,
  • send a picture to my email mayuri.ajay.patel62@gmail.com
  •  tag me as #mayuri_jikoni on Instagram
  • or tag me on Twitter as #Mayuri1962

 

36 Comments

  • Kalyani

    April 13, 2020 at 5:07 pm

    Simple , yet essential powder in every Gujarati kitchen am sure. We use the powder separately when making curries, but should try this spice blend. Mayuri – I always admire your style of writing – detailed yet so much informative and educative ..

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 14, 2020 at 6:06 pm

      Thank you so much Kalyani for the compliment. The ready mix is so much easier to use and as I mentioned its an important spice blend for Gujarati cuisine.

  • Ruchisvegkitchen

    April 13, 2020 at 8:54 pm

    Wow what a wonderful share. Ya Me too make at home. I add some bayleafs too while grinding , it adds lots of fragrance and taste. Lovely written post. Thank you for adding a recipe from my collection .

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 14, 2020 at 6:04 pm

      Thanks Ruchi, next batch I make I’ll add bayleaf.

  • Priya Srinivasan

    April 13, 2020 at 9:10 pm

    Thats a wonderful spice mix mayuri-ji, a simple, yet flavorsome spice mix!!! Freshly made masala’s have a wonderful aroma and flavor!!! Thank you for linking to mine as well!!!

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 14, 2020 at 6:04 pm

      Thank you Priya and you’re welcome.

    2. The Girl Next Door

      April 15, 2020 at 7:41 am

      What a lovely post, Mayuriji! Dhana jeeru is an essential part of every Gujarati kitchen. As simple a thing as it is, it literally breathes life into several Gujju dishes. Thank you for teaching us how to make this quintessential masala right.

      1. mayurisjikoni

        April 16, 2020 at 4:00 pm

        Most welcome Priya, I cannot imagine making most of the Gujarati dishes without dhana jiru.

  • FoodTrails

    April 15, 2020 at 1:02 am

    Dhania and jeera powder are used so commonly in most of curries.. making a mix is a very handy idea Mayurji..i usually make separate powders.. shall keep it this way.. Pics are so stunning and masala powder looks so fresh!!

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 16, 2020 at 4:03 pm

      Thank you so much Swaty, its an essential spice for the Gujarati cuisine and I tend to make small batches so that the spice mixture is fresh and flavorful.

  • Shama

    April 15, 2020 at 2:03 am

    nice preparation

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 16, 2020 at 4:02 pm

      Thank you Shama.

  • poonampagar

    April 16, 2020 at 3:56 am

    I also make dhaniya and jeera powder together as you have mentioned here di . It is so handy and even in our Maharashtrian cuisine we use it widely in our curries and Thalipeeth. Loved your antic motar and pestle !

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 16, 2020 at 3:57 pm

      Thank you so much Poonam, had no idea that its widely used in Maharashtrian cuisine. But then both Gujarati and Maharashtrian cuisines are similar in so many ways. The antique mortar and pestle is probably more than 50 years old, belongs to my MIL.

  • preethi76

    April 19, 2020 at 7:58 am

    This simple spice blend is so flavourful and comes in handy in our daily cooking. Never made a mix of Dhania and Jeera. So beautifully explained about the various spice powders. I am going to make this soon and store it . Always been using separate powders.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 19, 2020 at 7:09 pm

      Thank you so much Preethi. Its definitely a handy spice mixture to have around.

  • Vasusvegkitchen

    April 19, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Nice write up as always di, firstly loved your motar pestle and wooden box containing masala powder a lot di😍. I always have coriander and cumin powders handy, never tried of mixing both. Would love to try your version for my next batch masala di👍.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 20, 2020 at 4:50 pm

      Thanks Aruna, mortar and pestle has been in the family for over 50 years and the wooden box is a present from hubby’s friend who lives in Bangkok.

  • namscorner18

    April 20, 2020 at 9:18 pm

    coriander and cumin looks to be flavorful combination. Will surely try to make dhana jiru powder when making some gujarati recipes

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 20, 2020 at 11:32 pm

      Thank you so much Namradha.

  • Renu Agrawal Dongre

    April 21, 2020 at 5:28 pm

    We make dhaniya and Jeera powder but never mix it. This is handy as both the spices goes in one. Plus I would have the perfect ratio to choose when I make some Gujarati recipes. Pics are very good.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 21, 2020 at 8:40 pm

      Thanks Renu, can’t imagine any Gujarati masala dabba without it.

  • Sasmita Sahoo Samanta

    April 21, 2020 at 6:35 pm

    My eyes are on the mortar pestel di !! Love it.
    This Dhana Jiru I too use in most dishes. Love the flavor comes out from this grounded masala powder in any simple dishes.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 21, 2020 at 8:37 pm

      Thanks Sasmita, the mortar and pestle has been in the family for ages. And you’re so right, dhana jiru adds so much flavour even to simple dishes.

  • Mireille Roc (@ChefMireille)

    April 23, 2020 at 10:05 pm

    I actually have a dhaba box but I just put in it the spices I use most often. This is a great staple spice powder to be able to make at home

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 25, 2020 at 8:34 pm

      Mireille mine too is filled with spices that I use on a daily basis. And yes this essential spice mixture is very easy to make.

  • Mina Joshi (@GiveMeSomeSpice)

    April 23, 2020 at 11:45 pm

    Home made dhana jiru brings the best flavours to any curry. I used to make it but we used to get really freshly milled dhana jiru here. Not so sure now after the lockdown.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 25, 2020 at 8:32 pm

      Thanks Mina and its true dhana jiru adds so much flavour to any dish.

  • shobhakeshwani

    April 24, 2020 at 2:22 am

    Oh so you mix both the spices and grind together. I always grind them separately. Home made spices give a lovely flavour to the curries as we roast them before grinding.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      April 24, 2020 at 4:31 pm

      Thanks Shobha, this mixture is actually a must in every Gujarati kitchen.

  • ARCHANA

    May 10, 2020 at 3:34 pm

    One of the most basic spices that many young and old fail to make properly. The basis on which my food gets prepared. I have stopped mixing the two spices and hoard them separate for some time now. I am due to make some will this time mix the two. I love your pictures and o la la your masala dabba is so neat and tidy. Do nt look in mine. 😀

    1. mayurisjikoni

      May 10, 2020 at 4:21 pm

      Thank you so much Archana, my masala dabba,salt, sugar, tea and coffee jars, oil and ghee cans are always clean. I get a mental block if they are dirty and cannot begin cooking.

  • Malini

    May 16, 2020 at 11:43 am

    When I make my dhara jiru I add haldi powder while roasting both dhana and jiru it gives a totally different colour. Try it and let me know.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      May 18, 2020 at 7:46 pm

      Thanks Malini, the reason we don’t add haldi powder to it is because then I cannot use it for dishes that I prepare for Ekadashi fasting as on those days we are not allowed turmeric. However, I know of families who add it.

  • Seema Doraiswamy Sriram

    May 27, 2020 at 4:51 am

    This is such and essential condiment in our kitchens. My husband likes a bit of this in his coffee too. He says it wakes him up.

    1. mayurisjikoni

      May 27, 2020 at 1:23 pm

      Wow, never tried dhana jiru in coffee… will try it.

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